Why is coronavirus so dangerous. Here's why coronavirus is so dangerous + how to protect yourself

Here's why coronavirus is so dangerous + how to protect yourself

why is coronavirus so dangerous

Consider, for example, the history of the Justinianic Plague c. Peter Hotez, a vaccine scientist at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. This is why it is beyond absurd that the World Health Organization has yet to declare the emerging coronavirus from Wuhan, China, an international public health emergency, despite there already being close to — the vast majority in China— and at least 80 deaths. The flu and coronaviruses are thought to be spread in a similar fashion through infected respiratory droplets from coughs and sneezes. Estimates over the past few years have suggested that between 15 million and 25 million people died, most in just the first three years of the outbreak.

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Explainer: Why the New Coronavirus Is So Dangerous

why is coronavirus so dangerous

Public health knows no borders, no boundaries, nor should it. Also read: The paramount reason for breathless is the fact that this new virus attacks the lungs and not just the throat. Plague certainly struck the Mediterranean, but it did not seem to affect the lives of most people. There is no specific treatment, management being supportive. H1N1 flu and the mosquito-carried Zika did spread to different regions but were nowhere near as deadly as anticipated. Doctors will heroically risk their lives to fight the disease and cure the pandemic. China is haltingr of the outbreak; the city of Wuhan is building its second emergency coronavirus hospital in a month.

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Coronavirus: Why infections from animals are such a deadly problem

why is coronavirus so dangerous

The virus has already killed at least 25 people in China and more than 800 people are sick. The take home message is clear, the coronavirus is associated with considerable lethality. The mortality rate target is unclear right now, but is close to 5%. The common cold by itself is benign. The internet is already awash with conspiracy theories that the virus has a patent with a vaccine ready for administration.

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Explainer: Why the New Coronavirus Is So Dangerous

why is coronavirus so dangerous

Similarly, an examination of pollen collected in lake bed sediments — indicative of land use and therefore agricultural activity — found that unlike during the Black Death, there was no sudden decrease in agricultural activity. While the coronavirus is spreading fast, flu is the bigger worry in the U. Health officials are trying to figure out how contagious it is, and are trying to develop a vaccine against it, but it takes time. Coronaviruses are very unstable, frequently mutate, and jump from one species to another. Yes, a few high-profile authors from the period described the plague, and several other written sources briefly referred to a disease outbreak.

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Why Coronavirus Is Dangerous

why is coronavirus so dangerous

We have scores of students studying medicine in China, apart from people in the business community. The last day of the last decade provided the information that a brand new viral disease had emerged in Wuhan, China. The quintessential infectious disease that frames our way of thinking is the medieval Black Death, which devastated Europe from 1346-1351. There is no proven antiviral treatment for the coronavirus. It was unfortunate that a nurse who cared for an Ebola patient in Texas in 2014, despite wearing protective gear, still managed to acquire the dreaded disease by violating protocol and then getting on a plane. Ebola, for example, is a deadly virus but is fairly stable and difficult to contract, so it is a limited worldwide threat in its current form. Separately, scientists in Texas, New York and China are also trying to create a vaccine, said Dr.

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Why treating the coronavirus like the Black Death is so dangerous

why is coronavirus so dangerous

And therefore a step, however small, has been made to construct a vaccine. But assuming that all infectious diseases potentially have the same outcome as the Black Death would be a mistake. It is no surprise that we are frightened of infectious diseases that seem to threaten our lives, or that we are reminded of how plagues wiped out people in the past. But the intermediary animal is as yet not known. The Chinese have already reported 81 deaths, and more than 1,500 confirmed cases. We need science rather than hysteria in order to contain them.

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