Coronavirus wildlife market. Coronavirus traced to Chinese wildlife market

On the menu at China 'virus market': Rats and live wolf pups

coronavirus wildlife market

Much of China's wildlife trade, according to experts, was : China's bans the hunting and selling of endangered species but doesn't apply to all wild animals. In reality, to many Chinese, consuming wild animals is a cultural outlier. Any trader who violates the ban will be reported. But this persistence raised the possibility of developing a vaccine, given there was a consistent population in which to test the effectiveness of such a treatment. The youngest confirmed case is a nine-year-old girl in Beijing. Because of coronavirus concern, Wuhan is currently under. The city of over 11 million residents has been on lockdown amid the coronavirus outbreak, which has been linked to a wet seafood market there that sold exotic wildlife for human consumption.

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How Coronavirus and the Wildlife Trade are Linked

coronavirus wildlife market

The scale of the live wild animal trade in China is unclear, experts say. Bats, gorillas and chimpanzees love the fruit. These are perfect laboratories for creating opportunities for these viruses to emerge. The pangolin, an elusive mammal that looks like a cross between an anteater, an armadillo and a pinecone, is the most trafficked animal in the world, with over 100,000 killed last year. China bans the trafficking of a number of wild species or requires special licenses, but regulations are loose for some species if they are commercially farmed. Read more from the Wall Street Journal.

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New coronavirus can spread between humans—but it started in a wildlife market

coronavirus wildlife market

Presumably, none of these animals or their carcasses from these markets are screened for rabies, anthrax, salmonella or other animal-borne diseases. The is technically illegal in China, but rules are rarely. In Shanghai, 14 percent had, and in Beijing, just 5 percent. And scientists in the country revealed the deadly strain shares a common ancestor with. Many possibilities have been floated, including snakes which is unlikely , pigs, civets, and — endangered mammals that are in China, Vietnam, and parts of West Africa and whose scales are used in traditional Chinese medicine.

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Inside the horrific, inhumane animal markets behind pandemics like coronavirus

coronavirus wildlife market

That outbreak was contained as none of the infected people went to major transport hubs and none of the meat made it to major markets. And the is responsible for bringing these possibly infected meats to markets. These exotic could contain deadly bacteria and pathogens, like coronavirus. In Guangzhou, 83 percent of people interviewed had eaten wildlife in the previous year. The possible link wasn't on many radar screens at the Indonesian market, however.

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New coronavirus can spread between humans—but it started in a wildlife market

coronavirus wildlife market

The virus then jumped from that animal to people at a wildlife market. It emphasized the importance of combating the illegal trafficking of wild animals and changing risky wildlife consumption behaviors. We can't tolerate this anymore. Across China there have been 2,744 confirmed cases, with 1,423 cases being in Hubei. These unregulated markets must stop. A vendor sells bats at a market in Sulawesi, Indonesia, on February 8.

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How Coronavirus and the Wildlife Trade are Linked

coronavirus wildlife market

But scientists are debating how the new virus, which has killed more than 1,100 people in China and spread to dozens of countries around the world, was transmitted to humans. A study published in the China Science Bulletin claimed that the new shared a strain of virus found in bats. I spoke with each through Instagram, where they use English names. Scientists at Peking University also claim that the deadly virus was passed to humans from bats - via snakes, which are sold at the open-air market in Wuhan. A Forestry Administration official had not responded to a request for comment before publication.

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