Coronavirus the. How Long Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Last? It's Unclear

How Long Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Last? It's Unclear

coronavirus the

As of noon Friday, it has infected nearly 10,000 people, most of them in mainland China, and killed 213. There are no specific treatments or vaccines for the virus, though researchers are working to. A published in the Lancet on Wednesday found that, of about 100 hospitalized patients in China treated for 2019-nCoV, many received therapies like antivirals and oxygen. Researchers initially traced 2019-nCoV to a meat and seafood market in Wuhan, suggesting that it spread via animal vectors rather than human contact. February 19 The mounting toll of coronavirus deaths, involving on the and older people in hospitals, raises a basic question: How does the new virus make people sick, and why does it kill some of them? So far, the virus has turned up in numerous other countries, though human-to-human transmission in those secondary locations seems limited. How long will the outbreak last? As the coronavirus gains strength, Frieman said, dead cells are sloughed off and collect in the airway, making breathing difficult.

Next

How the new coronavirus can kill people or sicken them

coronavirus the

Someone with, by contrast, can infect more than a dozen. How does 2019-nCoV compare to other coronaviruses? Both result in symptoms including cough and fever, and—from what scientists can tell so far—both seem mainly via respiratory droplets and close person-to-person contact. Human-to-human transmission was confirmed later. Diseases that spread asymptomatically are harder to contain, since people may unwittingly pass them on by traveling or attending public events. They also might just gain temporary immunity. As cellular damage accumulates, lung tissue begins to stiffen. With infection, the virus probably begins to multiply inside cells lining the airway, which are fringed with hairlike structures.

Next

How the new coronavirus can kill people or sicken them

coronavirus the

But public health officials have emphasized that risk to the American public remains low, and spreading within the U. The heart must work harder to get limited oxygen to the rest of the organs. As a known as 2019-nCoV continues to spread throughout China and, the big question is: How long will the outbreak last—and how bad will it get? When the virus gets deep into the lungs, it can damage alveoli, the air sacs that take in oxygen. Of the five confirmed travel-related cases in the U. Health-care workers are at especially high risk because they are exposed to very high doses of the virus and also perform procedures — such as putting patients on ventilators to help them breathe — that can spread it. Many Americans likely grew a little nervous after the U. Common-sense practices like hand-washing and avoiding contact during an illness can go a long way, Marrazzo says.

Next

How Long Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Last? It's Unclear

coronavirus the

For those reasons, experts are recommending prevention measures in keeping with those deployed during a normal flu season. Or they might get a less severe case in the future — or not be protected at all. These people should call their health care provider and stay home from work or school if any symptoms develop. While research into nearly every facet of the virus is ongoing, scientists are starting to learn more. . The initial damage caused by the virus can trigger a powerful and counterproductive overreaction by the immune system itself.

Next

Coronavirus Prevention Is Largely the Same as Flu Prevention

coronavirus the

No one knows exactly how or why the novel coronavirus leads to death in just a small percentage of patients — about 2 percent of those infected, according to preliminary numbers. The virus is transmissible enough that the average sick patient, according to the paper, will infect about two others—enough to keep the outbreak going, but far less than could be expected of some viruses. Shenoy, an infectious diseases specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital. About a third of the patients had been discharged by the time the study was written. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said during a Jan. Jeanne Marrazzo, director of the division of infectious diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Next

Coronavirus Prevention Is Largely the Same as Flu Prevention

coronavirus the

One non-peer-reviewed posted online on Jan. . . . . . .

Next

Coronavirus Prevention Is Largely the Same as Flu Prevention

coronavirus the

. . . . . .

Next